Robot Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Side Control: Escapes

Robot Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Side Control: Escapes

Hey all!

Over the last few weeks, we have been focusing on the Side Control. We have learned a few transitions as well as a few submissions but our focus this time through is on escaping from the side control. With that in mind, this week I’d like to share a few tips for the major steps in escaping the side control. :]

Whether your opponent has taken your back, obtained the mount or side control, every escape can be broken down into 3 major steps – a) Position and Posture b) Bridge c) Hip-Escape.

Position and Posture refers to the alignment of your spine as well as the position and function of your hands and feet. In side control, your hands are primarily used to block your opponent’s shoulder from twisting your head (which addresses problems in spinal alignment) as well as using torque to create a frame against your opponent’s neck. This frame allows you to re-position your hands / body as well as move your opponent over your hips.

If your opponent is on your right-side, remember to cup your right hand completely over the bend in your opponent’s elbow and cup your left hand on top of their trapezius muscle. If your opponent draws their left arm back to free it from your right arm, remember not to over-extend your arm if you track them! They will be able to place a knee on top of your arm and defeat this frame, allowing them to once again regain control of your spine. With your left hand, your goal is to use the sharp side of your wrist to twist into the corner of their jaw – as you do this you will release your left hand grip and creep it further along towards the back of their skull. This ensures that you can continue to frame away on them with endangering your arm or positioning.

Saulo (bottom) has his right arm blocking the cross-face and is in the process of moving his left hand into a position to frame.
Saulo (bottom) has his right arm blocking the cross-face and is in the process of moving his left hand into a position to frame.

Once all of this is accomplished you can move to b) the Bridge – with your opponent now on top of your hips, a bridge will use your pelvis as a fulcrum that can lift you and your opponent up to the side. Make sure you have your feet tucked in as close to your butt as possible so you can extend your hip up and over to the side towards your opponent. Since we are assuming our opponent is on our left, as your bridge envision yourself trying to place your nose, shoulders, belt knot and knees into the upper right corner. This will help you move your body in unison. If your opponent had the mount and you trapped their arm before bridging, you would be able to roll them over and escape. However…

…This bridge is not usually enough to completely escape from Side Control because your opponent will move their feet to retain their balance and stay on top. However, a good bridge also leaves a gap behind / underneath you that you can c) Hip-escape into. Make sure you do not drop your hips or remove your feet from the ground after you bridge or you will be unable to hip-escape!

By elevating your hips with the bridge and creating space behind you, you can scoot back into this empty space (which wasn’t possible before because “empty space behind you” referred to the mat under your back – very difficult to move into :p) and then bring your knees towards your chest to replace the frames you created with your arms. Once you have successfully brought your knees into play and created a barrier between you and your opponent, you have escaped! You should quickly acquire some sort of grip with which to attack your opponent so they do not pass immediately and make you escape all over again.

OSS :]

-Coach T

P.S. There are many escapes and many more concepts to cover regarding escapes. Here you can see one more escape, demonstrated by Marcelo Garcia, for a pin that we will cover in the coming weeks. Notice how his opponent changes the pin he is using because Marcelo has blocked the cross-face in step 1. Enjoy! :]
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Mike Martinez and Leo Imai Fight on Friday! This Friday Coach Mike and Coach Leo are fighting in MMA at Mansion Fights 15! Tickets are at the Front Desk, doors open at 6pm, fights are at 8pm. The address is: 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach, CA, 90802. Robot will be hosting open mat from 11am - 2pm this Friday and will be closed for the remainder of the day - let's all get out there and show our support! :] :]
Mike Martinez and Leo Imai Fight on Friday!
This Friday Coach Mike and Coach Leo are fighting in MMA at Mansion Fights 15!
Tickets are at the Front Desk, doors open at 6pm, fights are at 8pm.
The address is: 1126 Queens Highway, Long Beach, CA, 90802.
Robot will be hosting open mat from 11am – 2pm this Friday and will be closed for the remainder of the day – let’s all get out there and show our support! :]
:]

 

Robot Fight & Fitness is West Los Angeles (90025) and Santa Monica’s premier martial arts training facility- we always offer a free class so call us today to come check us out!